At Sunnybrook Equestrian Center located in convenient in Scarborough, Maine, our focus is on quality. 
You will see that the moment you arrive on our lovely seven-acre farm, just minutes from Route One and Dunstan Corner. From our organized tack room, to our pristinely kept, custom-built barn, to our healthy, content horses, our focus on quality is obvious.

Whether you are young or young-at-heart, an experienced horseperson or just amazed at the power and beauty of the horse, we instruct riders of all levels and riding goals.


Sunnybrook Sport Horses updated their cover photo. ...

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Entries mailed earlier this week for the HVAHA horse show at Eastern States May 12-15! First Show of the season :) ...

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Day 2 of our Spring horse show camp! I'm so fortunate to work with such lovely young riders <3 Giddy Up! ...

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Congratulations to Caeleigh on her new boy "Luke". Such a sweet boy! ...

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Just a reminder every time you saddle up :) ...

The curse of perfectionism, and the power of "pretty good." All over the world, every day, riders are schooling horses. Horses do not "want" to be schooled. If you think that, you are a dreamer, still thinking like an eight year old, which is OK if you are 8, not so productive as you become more mature. And good trainers know that training is "hard" on horses, just as soccer practice or track practice or basketball practice or any sport that requires running and high energy expenditure is "hard" on human athletes. It is called athletically induced discomfort, and any human who is any kind of athlete will remember (or currently be experiencing) the pain of tired muscles, racing heart, panting breath, the feeling that running hard down that lacrosse field "one more time" near the end of a game is taking her/him out toward the end of her/his strength and endurance. But human athletes have goals, like earning a varsity letter, or having the esteem of the other kids, or winning a State Championship, and to attain those goals, they are willing to push through the pain. Horses have "goals", too, to eat grass, and hang in pastures with other horses. These goals have zero to do with "pleasing my darling owner who loves me." And when our horses are "being resistant", it is almost always because of either not understanding the aids being applied, or understanding them, but being tired and starting to get to that point, like the lacrosse player at the end of the game, where "one more time" is about the last straw. But perfectionist humans tend to be all over "one more time", because that last attempt wasn't good enough. And neither is this one, so do it again. And again. And again----- Learn to accept "pretty good" as good, and quit after a couple of "pretty goods." Don't keep drilling and drilling and grinding for perfection, because that will make the horse hate and dread the work. Get a little, quit for the day. Loose reins, a nice little pat, go for a walk. Lots of days of "pretty good" can turn into very good indeed, in ways that an insistence on "perfect" never can. Every time I hear that "Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect", in relationship to horse training, it makes me cringe. If you are one of those people with a visceral "need" to be perfect, take it out on some inanimate object like a musical instrument or a baseball bat, not on some living creature.

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